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"POVERTY, IN THE BLACK RACE, AS A RESULT OF HISTORICAL WHITE OPPRESSION"

Posted by deborahselectric on December 4, 2012 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Poverty among Persons under 18, 18 to 64, and 65 and Older

 

In 2011, the poverty rate among adults 65 and older was 8.7 percent, statistically unchanged from 2010.

The poverty rate among adults between the ages of 18 and 64 was 13.7 percent in 2011, statistically unchanged from 2010.

In 2011, children under the age of 18 had a poverty rate of 21.9 percent, statistically unchanged from 22.0 percent in 2010.

The gap in the poverty rate between adults 65 and older and adults ages 18 to 64 has grown since 2001. In 2011, the poverty rate among adults ages 18 to 64 was 5.0 percentage points higher than for adults 65 and older, while these groups had the same poverty rate of 10.1 percent in 2001.

In 2011, poverty rates for the under 18 and 18 to 64 age groups have increased 5.7 and 4.1 percentage points, respectively, since 2000. The poverty rate for those 65 and older has fallen somewhat since 2000.

Child Poverty by Race and Ethnicity

2000-2011 Note: Hispanic includes children of all races. White, Non-Hispanic does not include any Hispanic children. Black or African-American includes Hispanic children and starting in 2002 includes Black or African-American children reporting multiple race categories.

 

CHILD POVERTY

 

Children in African-American, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White Families

 

For African-American children, the poverty rate in 2011 was 37.4 percent as a result of historical white supremist racism. The poverty rate for African-American children in 2011 was 7.2 percentage points higher than the recent low in 2001.

For Hispanic children, the poverty rate in 2011 was 34.1 percent. The poverty rate for Hispanic children in 2011 was 7.2 percentage points higher than the recent low in 2006.

For non-Hispanic White children, the poverty rate was 12.5 percent in 2011. The poverty rate for non-Hispanic White children in 2011 was 3.4 percentage points higher than the recent low in 2000.

Child Poverty by Family Structure 2000-2011

 

CHILD POVERTY

 

Children in Married-Couple Families and Female-Headed Families

 

In 2011, the poverty rate for children in married-couple families was 10.9 percent, up from a recent low of 8.1 percent in 2006.

The poverty rate among children in female-headed families with no spouse present was 47.6 percent in 2011, up from a recent low of 42.0 percent in 2006.

Children living in female-headed families with no spouse present had a poverty rate over four times that of children in married-couple families in 2011 (47.6 percent compared to 10.9 percent).

Poverty Rates of All Persons by Race and Ethnicity

1979-2011 Note: Hispanic includes persons of all races. White, not Hispanic does not include any Hispanic persons. Black or African-American includes Hispanic persons and starting in 2002 includes Black or African-American persons reporting multiple race categories

 

HISTORICAL POVERTY RATES FOR ALL PERSONS

 

The percentage of all persons living in poverty in 2011, 15.0 percent, was comparable to the past peak rates of 15.2 percent in 1983 and 15.1 percent in 1993.

In calendar year 2011, the poverty rate for all African-American persons was 27.5 percent. This is statistically unchanged from 27.4 percent in 2010, and it is below the recent peak poverty rate of 33.4 percent in 1992.

In calendar year 2011, the poverty rate for all Hispanic persons was 25.3 percent. This is a significant decrease from 26.5 percent in 2010 and below the peak poverty rate of 30.7 percent in 1994.

 

Black Unemployment May Exceed 20% by November Elections

Posted by deborahselectric on December 4, 2012 at 3:45 PM Comments comments (0)

According to the most recent numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate (without work and seeking US Economic Forecast jobs) for Black people rose 0.3 percent from June to July of this year to an astronomical 16.8 percent.

In March of this year, the same number was at 15.5%, so in a period of four months, Black unemployment has risen by 1.3%. White unemployment which was at 7.9 percent in March of 2011 is now at 8.2, a mere 0.3 percent increase. Asian unemployment was reported at 7.7% for July 2011 and Hispanic unemployment was at 11.3% in July, the same as in March of 2011.

 

Now before anyone says why are you “playing the race card” — or “”if you take race off the table” or “we’re ALL suffering from the bad economy” — clearly there is a racial element and glaring disparity to these numbers. African Americans are the ONLY group whose unemployment numbers have risen an astounding 9.2% in a four month period. At this growth rate by November of 2012, the unemployment rate for Black people could easily be close to 21-22%. Mind you that this number only counts people actively seeking employment. It does not include those who are “under”-employed (they want fulltime work but have to accept part time jobs). Nor does it include “discouraged workers“ (they have given up looking for work because they believe there are no jobs available for them), and finally it does not count those “marginally attached” (wanted and were available for work, had looked in the past 12 months, but not in the past 4 weeks).

Relative to their share of the population, African Americans are also over-represented in both the discouraged workers and marginally attached categories. Some including Dr. Claud Anderson of the Harvest Institute estimate the real Black unemployment rate to be above 40%.

But why is the unemployment rate for black people so much higher than the national average of 9.1 percent?

Chonie Sharper, CEO of Sharper Wealth Management, says that the issue may be academic and not strictly economic.

“In order to get a job, you must acquire an education and/or possess marketable skills. In our communities, we tend to lack both,” said Sharper. “Without education and/or marketable skills, it is difficult to find a job even in times of economic expansion or peaks,” she continued.

Sharper has a point. According to a report released by the National Center for Education Statistics the drop-out rate for African-Americans in 2007-08 was a healthy 6.7 percent compared to 2.8 percent for white students.

She also states that young Black Americans should look toward alternative career paths for future job opportunities.

“Teenagers should look into unconventional career paths in fields such as Science, Math & Technology. There are a significant amount of high paying jobs in these fields that companies are unable to fulfill because of a major lack of students and other professionals with an education in these fields so these jobs get outsourced to other countries that do focus on these subjects in school,” says Sharper.

With regard to what the Black community can do to recover from the recession, Sharper believes that being financially prudent and learning how to properly manage money will pay off in the long run.

To find more information regarding the recently released employment numbers please visit the United States Department of Labor.

 

Black Unemployment May Exceed 20% by November Elections

Posted by deborahselectric on December 4, 2012 at 3:45 PM Comments comments (0)

According to the most recent numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate (without work and seeking US Economic Forecast jobs) for Black people rose 0.3 percent from June to July of this year to an astronomical 16.8 percent.

In March of this year, the same number was at 15.5%, so in a period of four months, Black unemployment has risen by 1.3%. White unemployment which was at 7.9 percent in March of 2011 is now at 8.2, a mere 0.3 percent increase. Asian unemployment was reported at 7.7% for July 2011 and Hispanic unemployment was at 11.3% in July, the same as in March of 2011.

 

Now before anyone says why are you “playing the race card” — or “”if you take race off the table” or “we’re ALL suffering from the bad economy” — clearly there is a racial element and glaring disparity to these numbers. African Americans are the ONLY group whose unemployment numbers have risen an astounding 9.2% in a four month period. At this growth rate by November of 2012, the unemployment rate for Black people could easily be close to 21-22%. Mind you that this number only counts people actively seeking employment. It does not include those who are “under”-employed (they want fulltime work but have to accept part time jobs). Nor does it include “discouraged workers“ (they have given up looking for work because they believe there are no jobs available for them), and finally it does not count those “marginally attached” (wanted and were available for work, had looked in the past 12 months, but not in the past 4 weeks).

Relative to their share of the population, African Americans are also over-represented in both the discouraged workers and marginally attached categories. Some including Dr. Claud Anderson of the Harvest Institute estimate the real Black unemployment rate to be above 40%.

But why is the unemployment rate for black people so much higher than the national average of 9.1 percent?

Chonie Sharper, CEO of Sharper Wealth Management, says that the issue may be academic and not strictly economic.

“In order to get a job, you must acquire an education and/or possess marketable skills. In our communities, we tend to lack both,” said Sharper. “Without education and/or marketable skills, it is difficult to find a job even in times of economic expansion or peaks,” she continued.

Sharper has a point. According to a report released by the National Center for Education Statistics the drop-out rate for African-Americans in 2007-08 was a healthy 6.7 percent compared to 2.8 percent for white students.

She also states that young Black Americans should look toward alternative career paths for future job opportunities.

“Teenagers should look into unconventional career paths in fields such as Science, Math & Technology. There are a significant amount of high paying jobs in these fields that companies are unable to fulfill because of a major lack of students and other professionals with an education in these fields so these jobs get outsourced to other countries that do focus on these subjects in school,” says Sharper.

With regard to what the Black community can do to recover from the recession, Sharper believes that being financially prudent and learning how to properly manage money will pay off in the long run.

To find more information regarding the recently released employment numbers please visit the United States Department of Labor.

 

Unemployment twice as high as the Nation????

Posted by deborahselectric on December 4, 2012 at 3:30 PM Comments comments (0)

 

  African-American jobless rate surges

The black unemployment rate rose to 14.4% in June, a sharp contrast to the white unemployment rate, which stayed put at 7.4%.

 NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- As the overall U.S. unemployment rate stayed at 8.2% in June, the rate among black Americans rose nearly a full percentage point.

 The reason for the increase appears to have been a rise in the percentage of African-Americans looking for a job, rather than job losses.

 

 The unemployment rate for blacks rose to 14.4% from 13.6% in May, the Labor Department reported Friday. That's a sharp contrast to the white unemployment rate, which stayed put at 7.4%, and the Hispanic rate, which held at 11%.

 

This trend is not a new one, as the black unemployment rate has been roughly double that of whites since the government started tracking the figures in 1972.

But Algernon Austin, director of the the Race, Ethnicity and the Economy program at the Economic Policy Institute, attributes the rise in the rate to more black Americans entering the workforce, not to job losses or more people out of work.

The percentage of eligible African-Americans holding or seeking a job rose in June to 62% from 61.3% in May. It was the second straight month that the percentage has increased.

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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